A fellow Plan B lover has just published her wonderful story …the world is made of faith, and trust, and pixie dust…”

It’s beautifully written and serves as a terrific coda to the film. (The film is but the beginning, after all.) The characterisations of both Pablo and Bruno are spot on and I found it a very believable future for the boys. Also, there are a few unresolved issues, when you think about it. And here they are dealt with in a very satisfying manner, with a dollop of angst and a whole slew of happiness. I love it very much. And I’m so, so glad there’s more fanfiction in this miniscule fandom. Here’s hoping for more!

So, highly recommend reading for all Plan B fans. Or just fans of smart, well-written fanfiction. :) 

Scott Matthew - Sweet Kiss in the Afterlife

I’ve fallen in love with Scott Matthew’s music, it’s frail and etheral, but still very melodic and underneath it all, there’s a great pop song. I’m a melody nerd, at heart, so I love people who can write beautiful melodies and who can sing so the melody isn’t lost. Scott Matthew sounds a bit like Elvis Costello when he sings, but he’s got a lovely voice. And this song is just splendid.

Pablo proposes they should have sex, and Bruno is giddy and a bit flabbergasted. But he’s also getting pretty enthusiastic about the idea.

Firstly, he looks down at his crotch - methinks he’s a little aroused. And can’t believe himself! Secondly, he takes off his shoes and gets comfy on the bed. A few more moments, and he’d have stripped completely, I’m sure. 

(Feel free to also talk about Hawaii in the comments, if you want… The other post is too big now. Again!)

We needed another Hawaii-post! And turns out I have more thoughts to share…

1. Martín’s clothes are worn and dirty from the first day he arrives in the village. And he obviously only own one pair of pants and two shirts. What happened to him before this? Why doesn’t he own any clean, whole clothes? He says he has a few things at a cousin’s place… Martín is a guy who’s probably close to 30 years old, and he’s been living with his grandmother in a little town in Uruguay. Why hasn’t he moved away earlier to find work? It’s possible he lived there because he couldn’t afford anything else, but surely, these past ten years or so when he’s been grown-up, he’s made some kind of life of his own? He must have had some income. It’s a little weird. Have times in Uruguay and Argentina been that difficult that an able bodied and resourceful guy like Martín can’t get a job which pays his rent? So what has he been doing these past years? Has he been in a monastery? That would explain the crucifix… *g*

2. When Martín arrives at Eugenio’s place, he’s acting very neutral, just asking for work. But then, as an after-thought, almost, he adds that they know each other. Surely, he knew that would garner a reaction from Eugenio, making him more inclined to hire him? He pretends it’s of no consequence in that moment, but I’m sure he knows what he’s doing. Then again, when Eugenio happily invites him in, he refuses, probably because he doesn’t want Eugenio to feel too forced. He sets the boundaries between them right from the start, creating an imbalance.

3. Eugenio likes to find reasons to touch Martín’s back. :)

Bruno is one with the kitty. It’s really no wonder Pablo just HAD to photograph him. :D

Maurice (1987)

Maurice is one of my favourite period films, and like A Room With A View, it’s beautiful, perfectly acted and has a great big, aching heart.

I’ve always felt more for Maurice & Clive than for Maurice & Alec, since I feel the latter is more of a fantasy, a dream, rather than reality. Even though I’m also always glad Maurice gets a happy ending, at least for a while.

What would have happened if Maurice & Clive would not have been interrupted that first time in the squeaky chair? How physical would their relationship have become at that point? Clive is the instigator, but where would he have stopped? His belief in platonic love between men wasn’t something he came up with on a whim, but maybe his youthful passion would have taken precedent for once. If you look at Clive’s relationship with his wife (I love that Clive’s wife is portrayed sympathetically, it adds to the complexity), it’s very chaste as well. Seems Clive was a man with less need for physical love - or someone who’d learnt to control it so well he’d forgotten it ever existed. 

It’s not hard to understand Clive, in spite of his abandonment of Maurice. He has responsibilities, family and a desire to belong. It wasn’t an easy choice in those days. Maurice doesn’t come from the same kind of family and Maurice’s choice in the end is one of exclusion; he and Alec won’t ever be able to live freely and openly. Also, I’ve always felt that Maurice & Alec’s relationship is (initially at least) more about Maurice finally experiencing physical love and getting a release for all his pent up desire than it is about love. Alec is a decent, clever and ambitious man, though. And maybe he and Maurice could make a life for themselves in some other part of the world. 

Five Dances (2013)

This is a beautiful film, very simple plot, but such amazing dancing and providing me with a happy, warm feeling. There was something quite mesmerizing about the film. Very quiet, very low-key, but it just drew me right in. A lovely film about dancing and falling in love. 

Part of what makes it work is definitely due to the music, as evidenced in the video above. The song is Sinking, by Scott Matthew. I’ve never heard him before, but wow, I love it so much. Such a beautiful song! 

I can’t quite leave our Hawaii-theories… (you should never say ‘final’ or ‘never again’, because soon you’re Celine Dion and on your third ‘farewell tour’.)

Here are three scenes which are still slightly mysterious, but for which I think we’ve come up with some interesting thoughts.

1. Why is Eugenio being such a childishly bad loser when shooting the air rifle and running?
Eugenio & Martín knew each other as kids, and obviously played quite a lot together. Eugenio is about three years older than Martín, which meant he was significantly bigger than Martín when they played. Eugenio was probably the one deciding what they should do and how. And Eugenio, being most likely taller and more developed, probably used to win against Martín. 

When they get to know each other again, they haven’t seen each other since they were little, and so Eugenio is automatically reverting to how they related to each other as kids, He probably feels he’s the one who should teach Martín things and also protect him, help him. Like when they were kids. Until it turns out it’s no longer true. Martín is now better than him, stronger. And so Eugenio gets confused and acts like a very bad loser. And like the child he’s momentarily reverted to.

2. Why was Eugenio being so grumpy and short with Martín after they slept in the same bed?

Drunkenly, Eugenio has groped Martin a bit and then fell asleep on him. He probably feels he’s lost the control he had of the situation. Up until then he’s kept a certain distance in a way, and has been able to stay in his head and just watch Martín, from a kind of distance, like a fantasy that won’t come true. Instead it becomes reality in a way it hasn’t before. 

And so he’s taken out of his head, he can’t concentrate on his book and he’s starting to think of the issues then brought up by his brother. It’s uncomfortable and he regrets changing what he found so pleasant before, when he could hang out with Martín without feeling any pressure.

3. Why does Eugenio come by Martín’s room asking for poison? What does Martín hope to achieve by taking his clothes off? And why does Eugenio looks so scared?

Eugenio wanted an excuse to see Martín, this was the best he could do… And Martín is trying the same thing Eugenio’s done earlier in the film, randomly taking off his shirt, to get a reaction (what he expected Eugenio to do remains a mystery - but he’s probably just being a little clumsy with his seduction technique). And thus demonstrating (without knowing it) that Eugenio is no longer the one in control. Again, that scares the hell out of Eugenio.

12 Monkeys (1995) - Terry Gilliam

I just saw that SyFy is making a tv series out of 12 Monkeys. And while I can always hope it’ll turn out interesting, I do have doubts.

12 Monkeys is my favourite time travel film, and one of my favourite films all together. It’s the only time travel film which actually works within some sort of logic. It’s such beatifully melancholy film, very dystopian, very dark (yet also very funny, it’s Terry Gilliam after all). 

The reason 12 Monkeys works so well for me is how we as an audience are led to believe there’s hope, that there’s a possibility to change what went wrong, to make a better future. But in reality, everything that has ever happened, just happens again and again. Nothing can be changed. It sounds horribly depressing - and I suppose it is - but I remember feeling excited by the concept when I first saw it.

Anyway, brilliant film - a tv show without the insanely brilliant mind of Terry Gilliam most likely won’t measure up.

Sometimes you wonder if you’ve seen the same film - here Hawaii - when you read other people’s comments… Who’s in denial (I suppose he means Eugenio)? Sad ending? Wishful thinking? Huh. Hilarious!

We already know Berger as the director of the excellent films, Plan B and Absent. Hawaii is even better. Two young men meet and gradually realise that they were childhood friends. One of them is gay but in denial. What of the other? Both of them are desperately lonely. The audience is kept in suspense and the tension is never really relaxed. A sad ending appears inevitable and yet does not seem to materialise. Is the happy ending really happening or is it wishful thinking on the part of one or both of the characters? The Hawaii element is a key factor at this point in a fascinating and haunting film. 

From here.
This recent review, captures the relationship between Eugenio & Martín perfectly, though. :)

Sometimes you wonder if you’ve seen the same film - here Hawaii - when you read other people’s comments… Who’s in denial (I suppose he means Eugenio)? Sad ending? Wishful thinking? Huh. Hilarious!

We already know Berger as the director of the excellent films, Plan B and Absent. Hawaii is even better. Two young men meet and gradually realise that they were childhood friends. One of them is gay but in denial. What of the other? Both of them are desperately lonely. The audience is kept in suspense and the tension is never really relaxed. A sad ending appears inevitable and yet does not seem to materialise. Is the happy ending really happening or is it wishful thinking on the part of one or both of the characters? The Hawaii element is a key factor at this point in a fascinating and haunting film. 

From here.

This recent review, captures the relationship between Eugenio & Martín perfectly, though. :)